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Posts Tagged ‘Virginia Woolf and Ethics’

Inspiring. Insightful. Intimate. Those are three words I could use to describe the four days of Virginia Woolf and Ethics, the 31st Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, which ran from June 9-12.

Held remotely on Zoom for the second year in a row and hosted by Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas, with Amy Smith as organizer, the conference brought together around 270 Woolf scholars from around the globe, including Brazil, the Netherlands, Norway, Candada, the UK, and the US.

Links to share

I took lots of notes. Sadly, I don’t have the time or the energy to share them all. Instead, I’ll list just a few online resources that some of the presenters and participants shared with us. Readers, feel free to add yours in the comments section below.

Here goes.

Favorite quote and rave reviews

And here is one of my favorite quotes from the conference. There were many more, but this is the only one I managed to get down on paper verbatim.

It comes from Ane Thon Knutsen, of the Oslo National Academy of the Arts in Norway, who presented “On Being Ill – A letterpress printed Covid-19 diary.”

You have no control over what happens when you read books. And it’s magical. – Ane Thon Knutsen

Ane, along with many other presenters, got rave reviews. One was Beth Rigel Daugherty, whose brilliant and heartfelt final plenary, “On the Ethics of Teaching: Virginia Woolf’s Essays,” awed participants and brought them to tears.

Below is just one of the many information-rich PowerPoint slides Beth shared in her talk. It lists some of the Woolf essays that informed her 36 years of teaching at Otterbein University and warned her against preaching to her students, a caveat she took to heart.

Recently retired, Beth’s latest project is a book for Edinburgh University Press — Virginia Woolf’s Apprenticeship: Becoming an Essayist (2022).

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Virginia Woolf and Ethics, the 31st Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, begins tomorrow, June 9, and runs through Sunday, June 12. And while it is hosted by Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas, it is taking place completely online, giving the conference the ability to draw in a wide variety of participants from around the globe.

You can still register and Zoom in to four days of multidisciplinary conversation about Woolf and ethics.

Important conference links

  • The program for the four-day virtual event
  • Registration for attendees who are not presenting. Four-day ($40) and single-day ($20) registrations are available.
  • Plenary details, including
    • Gretchen Holbrook Gerzina, “Rethinking Bloomsbury and Race in the Wake of BLM”
    • Peter Stansky, “How the World Turns: Two Examples: Virginia Woolf and the Dreadnought Hoax; The Life of Julian Bell”
    • Beth Rigel Daugherty, “On the Ethics of Teaching: Virginia Woolf’s Essays”
    • Elsa Högberg, “Virginia Woolf’s Reparative Ethics”
  • Theater performance by Ellen McLaughlin and Kathleen Chalfant who have collaborated on “Life Stand Still Here,” which is based on Woolf’s diaries and Lily Briscoe’s painting in To the Lighthouse.

Virtual conferences include more global perspectives on Woolf

The idea that organizers of the annual Woolf conferences should work to include more global perspectives on Woolf studies was strongly articulated at the 29th annual Woolf conference in 2019. As the most recent in-person Woolf conference, it was held at Mount St. Joseph University in Cincinnati, Ohio, on the theme of Woolf and Social Justice.

The Covid-19 pandemic, which made virtual conferences a necessity, helped move that idea forward, making attendance easier and more economical for both presenters and participants.

Profession and Performance, the 30th annual Woolf conference, scheduled for 2020 at the University of South Dakota, was postponed until 2021 and was the first Woolf conference to be held virtually, on June 10-13, 2021. This year’s is the second.

Global perspectives on the last live Woolf conference

After the 2019 conference, the 29th, young scholars from Brazil, Czechoslovakia, Italy, and Canada shared their views on that conference. Below are links to their stories.

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