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Want to own a bookstore named after Virginia Woolf’s most famous character? You can. The award-wining Mrs. Dalloway bookstore in Berkeley, Calif., is up for sale.

We first heard of the shop in September 2014, when we made reference to a blurb about its Woolf connections and its book recommendations. Now, after 17 years in business, the two owners of the shop named after Woolf’s 1925 novel have listed it for sale.

About the shop

Set in the center of Berkeley’s Elmwood shopping district on College Avenue, the shop expanded in 2009, nearly doubling its space while other stores were facing challenges.

According to the shop’s website, it was then able to create “a vibrant events program with readings from leading novelists, poets, biographers and garden writers from not only the Bay Area but all over the United States and beyond, about 100 per year.”

Read more in the Berkeleyside.

Calling potential buyers

If you or someone you know might be interested in buying Mrs. Dalloway’s and carrying on its proud tradition, you can visit the shop’s website and click on the Buyers Guide for information on submitting a proposal. Owners Marion Abbott and Ann Leyhe hope to accomplish the sale by this fall. You can reach the shop at sale@mrsdalloways.com.

Starting yesterday and continuing through May 28, Berkeley Rep is presenting an ambitious new work: “The Waves in Quarantine,” free and online.

The project, based on Virginia Woolf’s 1931 poetic novel, The Waves, consists of six short films that meditate on friendship, loss, and the making of art in this world-changing year.

According to the performance website, the work includes “dazzling choral music, text from the novel itself, exquisite visual imagery, and access behind the scenes as these artists imagine, question, explore and experiment.”

While this online event is free, an RSVP is required at this link.

Literature Cambridge will finish its first Woolf Season with the last of Virginia Woolf’s major books.

Here is what remains on the schedule:

• Anna Snaith on The Years (1937), Sun. 2 May, 6 p.m.
• Claire Davison on Three Guineas (1938), Sat. 8 May, 6 p.m.
• Claire Nicholson on Between the Acts (1941): Costume, Sat. 29 May, 6 p.m.
• Karina Jukobowicz on Between the Acts (1941): Dispersed Are We, Sat. 5 June, 10 a.m.

Two repeats

And, in case you missed them, two earlier lectures will be repeated:

• Claudia Tobin, Art in To the Lighthouse (1927), Sun. 16 May, 6 p.m.
• Emma Sutton and Jeremy Thurlow, Music in The Waves (1931), Sun. 30 May, 6 p.m.

All sessions are live on Zoom. All times are British Summer Time. Sessions can be booked online.

Trudi Tate and Karina Jacubowicz are just two of the lecturers in the Literature Cambridge’s online courses on Virginia Woolf via Zoom.

Marking the 80th anniversary of Virginia Woolf’s death, the London Library will present an online dramatization of Virginia Woolf’s iconic 1928 feminist polemic, A Room of One’s Own, on Saturday, May 1, 8-9 p.m. BST.

The dramatization is adapted by Linda Marshall-Griffiths, directed by Charlotte Westenra, and filmed in The London Library.

Tickets are £10 and are available from the London Library website.

The event is part of the three-day online London Library Lit Fest, Saturday, May 1, to Monday, May 3. Festival Passes are available that include one ticket to all 14 main events, at a cost of £25.

Ticket holders are able to watch the online events live or any time up until June 13. They will be sent a link 24 hours before the event.

Is it today? Or was it yesterday? The date of the centenary anniversary of the publication of Virginia Woolf’s short story collection Monday or Tuesday is under debate, the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain admits.

Roundtable participants at the 27th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf in 2017 sit below a screen showing a digitized ledger sheet from the Hogarth Press.

The society celebrated the centenary with an email message to members and a post on its Facebook page that included mention of the date disparity, background about the book, and a list of the stories in the 1921 volume, the only collection of Woolf’s short fiction published in her lifetime.

Short stories in Monday or Tuesday

  • A Haunted House
  • A Society
  • Monday or Tuesday
  • An Unwritten Novel
  • The String Quartet
  • Blue & Green
  • Kew Gardens
  • The Mark on the Wall

About the book

Leonard and Virginia handset the type for Monday or Tuesday, which was the first of Woolf’s hardback books published by the Hogarth Press.

Vanessa Bell created the cover art, as well as the four woodcuts that appear inside the Hogarth Press edition.

Art and content aside, in Beginning Again, Leonard described it as “one of the worst printed books ever published, certainly the worst ever published by The Hogarth Press” (239).

Modernist Archives Publishing Project

The digital collection of the Modernist Archives Publishing Project, which officially debuted at the 27th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Virginia Woolf and the World of Books, includes Leonard’s order book. In his meticulous fashion, it details the names of people who bought copies of the original volume.

Photos courtesy of the Modernist Archives Publishing Project

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