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Archive for the ‘short stories’ Category

Is it today? Or was it yesterday? The date of the centenary anniversary of the publication of Virginia Woolf’s short story collection Monday or Tuesday is under debate, the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain admits.

Roundtable participants at the 27th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf in 2017 sit below a screen showing a digitized ledger sheet from the Hogarth Press.

The society celebrated the centenary with an email message to members and a post on its Facebook page that included mention of the date disparity, background about the book, and a list of the stories in the 1921 volume, the only collection of Woolf’s short fiction published in her lifetime.

Short stories in Monday or Tuesday

  • A Haunted House
  • A Society
  • Monday or Tuesday
  • An Unwritten Novel
  • The String Quartet
  • Blue & Green
  • Kew Gardens
  • The Mark on the Wall

About the book

Leonard and Virginia handset the type for Monday or Tuesday, which was the first of Woolf’s hardback books published by the Hogarth Press.

Vanessa Bell created the cover art, as well as the four woodcuts that appear inside the Hogarth Press edition.

Art and content aside, in Beginning Again, Leonard described it as “one of the worst printed books ever published, certainly the worst ever published by The Hogarth Press” (239).

Modernist Archives Publishing Project

The digital collection of the Modernist Archives Publishing Project, which officially debuted at the 27th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Virginia Woolf and the World of Books, includes Leonard’s order book. In his meticulous fashion, it details the names of people who bought copies of the original volume.

Photos courtesy of the Modernist Archives Publishing Project

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What: A one-day conference on Virginia Woolf and Her Early Short Stories that incorporates the general meeting of the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain
When: Saturday, 4th April 2020, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Registration begins at 10 a.m.
Where: Oriental Club, First Floor, 11 Stratford Place, London WIC IES. Opposite Bond Street tube.
Cost: £35 for members of the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain and students; £38 for non-members. Lunch and refreshments are included.

Tickets: For tickets, contact Sarah Latham Phillips at latham_phillips@yahoo.com

Availability: Space is limited to 55 and this event is already half-booked.

Speakers

  • Dr. Sue Roe, Writer, Biographer & Woolf scholar: ‘Reflections on Kew Gardens – and Blue and Green; and the Waves.”
  • Professor Frances Spalding, Emeritus Fellow, Clare Hall, Cambridge: ‘Virginia Woolf, Roger Fry and the Mark on the Wall.’
  • Sarah Latham Phillips MA, Freelance Lecturer: ‘The influence of the Visual Arts on the early short stories of Virginia Woolf.’

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I bought my first collection of Virginia Woolf’s short fiction in Brighton as an undergraduate on a study trip to “Bloomsbury in Sussex” (Charleston, Monks House, the river Ouse). Its cover, a detail from the painting Synthesis of the Supper Room at an Arts Club Reception by the Scottish post-impressionist Stanley Cursiter, patchworks together people and coffee cups, giving a sense of immediacy, of the fleeting moment, of lived experience. This depiction of the experience of consciousness, as Woolf put it in her essay “Modern Fiction,” the intention to “record the atoms as they fall upon the mind,” is also what draws me back to her short fiction.

Read the entire essay on the website of Open Letters Monthly: An Arts and Literature Review.

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Where I live, we are lucky to have Nightlight Cinema, a small locally-owned theatre that shows independent films ignored by the big theater complexes that feature blockbusters.

Drawn in by a preview of A Ghost Story, I attended Nightlight’s last showing of the film on Thursday. I was glad I did. Why? Two reasons. It was intriguing. And it pays tribute to Virginia Woolf.

The film, which has received rave reviews, includes the first line of Woolf’s short story “A Haunted House” in the opening credits. It is shown for a few moments on a dark background.

Whatever hour you woke there was a door shutting.

Filmmaker David Lowery’s use of the quote was a clue to what I didn’t know but soon learned — that Woolf is one of his favorite authors and her 1921 story helped inspire his film.

My investigation also uncovered the fact that when the ghost knocks several books off a shelf, the open book upon which the camera focuses includes important lines from “A Haunted House,” lines about treasure, buried treasure, “the light in the heart.”

Woolf as guiding light

Orlando is one of my favourite novels,” Lowery told the Irish Times. “I love her letters too. She’s my guiding light. The way she uses time fascinates me. Especially in To the Lighthouse and Orlando. They play with time in this dynamic and fun way. I love the idea of a character existing outside of time in the way that Orlando does.

“So that was certainly on my mind when I was writing the screenplay. And I wanted to pay homage to her in some small regard. And I wondered if she had ever written about ghosts. So I did a Google search. And found A Haunted House. I couldn’t believe that I had never read it before.

“The first sentence begins: ‘Whatever hour you woke there was a door shunting’. [sic] I couldn’t resist extending that to the film. I hope that it encourages somebody somewhere to pick up her work. Because I owe a lot to her.”

Playing with time as Woolf does

The film is a story of a house and its haunting, much like Woolf’s story. And it kept me thinking about its meaning and the message of the film long after I exited the theater, just as Woolf’s writing does long after I finish one of her novels or stories.

What’s more, Lowery plays with time in the film, much as Woolf does. As he noted in an interview with Huffington Post: “Virginia Woolf’s literature really transformed my own ideas about how to formally represent the passage of time and how time affects us. Specifically, the benchmarks are Mrs. DallowayTo the Lighthouse and Orlando, all of which have time as a central conceit.”

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Read here on the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew’s Library Art and Archives blog about the evolution of Virginia Woolf’s iconic short story Kew Gardens from its first edition with Vanessa Bell woodcut prints through the 1927 publication hand illustrated by Bell and on to RBG Kew’s new edition published in 2015 with contemporary illustrations by Livi Mills.

1927 cover

1927 edition of Kew Gardens held in RBG, Kew’s LAA collection

 

 

 

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