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Archive for the ‘Woolf online’ Category

Screenshot from the Sunday Zoom session on “Rethinking the Dreadnought Hoax” with Danell Jones.

Are we all Zoomed out and ready for a walk in the fresh air? The 30th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, held virtually for the first time via Zoom, is now over. And while seeing each other in tiny boxes was wonderful, we missed being together in person.

But kudos to conference organizer Ben Hagen, assistant professor of English at the University of South Dakota and president of the International Virginia Woolf Society, for pulling off this amazing virtual event.

Below is a selection of some of the most recent tweets found at the conference hashtag #vwwoolf2021.

It’s a follow-up to yesterday’s report.

 

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We are in the midst of the 30th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, which for the first time is being held virtually via Zoom. Postponed last year due to COVID-19, the conference began Thursday and runs through tomorrow. There’s still time to get a day pass.

Below we are sharing a selection of tweets found by following the conference hashtag #vwwoolf2021.

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At a time when inaccurate information spreads like wildfire via social media, it’s refreshing to learn that a major media outlet is interested in fact checking something as seemingly minor as a literary quote, particularly one attributed to Virginia Woolf.

“You cannot find peace by avoiding life” was the quote attributed to Woolf and shared more than 300 times by a Facebook group called “English literature and Linguistics.”

USA TODAY on the hunt

Then USA TODAY noticed. And reporter Rick Rouan, based in Columbus, Ohio, started checking into it. On his own, he was unable to find a record of Woolf saying or writing those words.

So he contacted a couple of folks in the Woolf community, including Blogging Woolf and Benjamin Hagen, assistant professor of English at the University of South Dakota who is heading up this year’s Woolf conference and serves as president of the International Virginia Woolf Society.

Woolfians join the search

I searched my copy of Major Authors on CD-ROM: Virginia Woolf and found no such statement in Woolf’s work. But Hagen traced it to the 2002 film “The Hours,” which is based on Michael Cunningham’s novel of the same title, inspired by Woolf’s 1925 novel Mrs. Dalloway.

The Facebook group that posted the quote Rouan investigated has apparently removed it from its page. Fact-checking information shared online is something USA TODAY does regularly, Rouan told me.

Read more about the hunt for the quote and its origins in “Fact check: Quote attributed to Virginia Woolf was in a movie, not her primary work.”

A collection of memes found in a Google search that include the quote falsely attributed to Woolf

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Literature Cambridge continues its online Virginia Woolf Season, studying all 12 major books by Woolf in chronological order.

Woolf’s groundbreaking A Room of One’s Own (1929) is up now, with online lectures via Zoom this month by Alison Hennegan on androgyny on March 6, and Trudi Tate on women on March 13 and 14.

These are followed by five different lectures on The Waves,  a rare chance to consider all aspects of this fascinating novel.

Five lectures on The Waves

  1. Emma Sutton on music in The Waves on March 23
  2. Ellie Mitchell on Percival in The Waves on April 3
  3. Trudi Tate on friendship in The Waves on April 4
  4. Karina Jakubowicz on gardens in The Waves on April 11
  5. Gillian Beer on “Reading The Waves Across a Lifetime” (repeated by popular request) on April 24

From Flush to Between the Acts

Alison Hennegan will discuss Flush on April 10.

Karina Jakubowicz lecturing for Literature Cambridge

Literature Cambridge will finish out its first Woolf Season with Claire Davison on music in Three Guineas, Anna Snaith on The Years, Claire Nicholson on Between the Acts and costume, and more.

Get more details and registration information.

Second Woolf Season this fall

A second Woolf Season is planned for October 2021, and you can study some of Woolf’s brilliant contemporaries in the Women Writers Season: May Sinclair, Sylvia Townsend Warner, Zora Neale Hurston, Jean Rhys, HD, Rosamund Lehmann, Vita Sackville West, Winifred Holtby, and others, starting in June 2021. https://www.literaturecambridge.co.uk/women

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Attention, Woolf readers around the globe. Literature Cambridge, which went virtual with its study sessions when the coronavirus hit, is in the midst of a Virginia Woolf Season that you won’t want to miss.

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Trudi Tate and Karina Jacubowicz are just two lecturers in Literature Cambridge’s online courses on Virginia Woolf via Zoom.

I, for one, have logged on to several sessions and plan to sign up for as many as my schedule will allow. Not only do I enjoy learning more about Woolf, it’s also fun to see old and new Woolf friends from all over the world, while benefiting from their knowledge and interest in Woolf.

Woolf Season details

The online classes, which explore Woolf’s major works in consecutive order, began in October with The Voyage Out (1915) and run through June 2021 with Between the Acts (1941). Each two-hour class via Zoom is taught by a Woolf expert from the UK and features a one-hour original lecture followed by a question and answer session.

Lisa Hutchins, who lives in Cambridge and is a former journalist turned college archivist, is penning blog posts on the Woolf Season. She wrote one on The Voyage Out and another on the lecture covering Night and Day: Tea and Tradition.

The cost is £26 at full price and £22 for students, CAMcard holders and members of the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain.

Read the Woolf Season blog

Lisa Hutchins, who lives in Cambridge and is a former journalist turned college archivist, is penning blog posts on the Woolf Season. She wrote one on The Voyage Out and another on the lecture covering Night and Day: Tea and Tradition.

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