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Is it today? Or was it yesterday? The date of the centenary anniversary of the publication of Virginia Woolf’s short story collection Monday or Tuesday is under debate, the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain admits.

Roundtable participants at the 27th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf in 2017 sit below a screen showing a digitized ledger sheet from the Hogarth Press.

The society celebrated the centenary with an email message to members and a post on its Facebook page that included mention of the date disparity, background about the book, and a list of the stories in the 1921 volume, the only collection of Woolf’s short fiction published in her lifetime.

Short stories in Monday or Tuesday

  • A Haunted House
  • A Society
  • Monday or Tuesday
  • An Unwritten Novel
  • The String Quartet
  • Blue & Green
  • Kew Gardens
  • The Mark on the Wall

About the book

Leonard and Virginia handset the type for Monday or Tuesday, which was the first of Woolf’s hardback books published by the Hogarth Press.

Vanessa Bell created the cover art, as well as the four woodcuts that appear inside the Hogarth Press edition.

Art and content aside, in Beginning Again, Leonard described it as “one of the worst printed books ever published, certainly the worst ever published by The Hogarth Press” (239).

Modernist Archives Publishing Project

The digital collection of the Modernist Archives Publishing Project, which officially debuted at the 27th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Virginia Woolf and the World of Books, includes Leonard’s order book. In his meticulous fashion, it details the names of people who bought copies of the original volume.

Photos courtesy of the Modernist Archives Publishing Project

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London Sign PostWe have all speculated about what Virginia Woolf would do if she were alive today.

I once wondered whether she would surf if she still summered at St. Ives.

Now I am wondering whether she would wear the designs of Nicole Farhi, who is said to be a favorite of the “British intelligentsia,” a group to which Woolf definitely belonged.

An article in the Telegraph thinks so. And since it notes that French fashion designer Farhi “creates clothing that women who don’t want to think about fashion don’t have to think about,” I may agree.

After all, Woolf  felt quite insecure about her own sense of style. She ascribes this sort of insecurity to the character of Mabel in the short story, “The New Dress.” Woolf writes, “of course, she [Mabel] could not be fashionable. It was absurd to pretend it even — fashion meant cut, meant style, meant thirty guineas at least.”

If Woolf felt the same way about herself, she may have been eager to wear one of Farhi’s designs, even though it would set her back more than thirty guineas.

This is my personal Nicole Farhi fashion pick for Virginia. It seems the perfect outfit for her to wear while exploring the London scene on a chilly December day.

Check out Farhi’s fall fashions and see which of them you think Virginia would wear. Then take the poll.

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