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Archive for the ‘Woolf Courses’ Category

Literature Cambridge continues its online Virginia Woolf Season, studying all 12 major books by Woolf in chronological order.

Woolf’s groundbreaking A Room of One’s Own (1929) is up now, with online lectures via Zoom this month by Alison Hennegan on androgyny on March 6, and Trudi Tate on women on March 13 and 14.

These are followed by five different lectures on The Waves,  a rare chance to consider all aspects of this fascinating novel.

Five lectures on The Waves

  1. Emma Sutton on music in The Waves on March 23
  2. Ellie Mitchell on Percival in The Waves on April 3
  3. Trudi Tate on friendship in The Waves on April 4
  4. Karina Jakubowicz on gardens in The Waves on April 11
  5. Gillian Beer on “Reading The Waves Across a Lifetime” (repeated by popular request) on April 24

From Flush to Between the Acts

Alison Hennegan will discuss Flush on April 10.

Karina Jakubowicz lecturing for Literature Cambridge

Literature Cambridge will finish out its first Woolf Season with Claire Davison on music in Three Guineas, Anna Snaith on The Years, Claire Nicholson on Between the Acts and costume, and more.

Get more details and registration information.

Second Woolf Season this fall

A second Woolf Season is planned for October 2021, and you can study some of Woolf’s brilliant contemporaries in the Women Writers Season: May Sinclair, Sylvia Townsend Warner, Zora Neale Hurston, Jean Rhys, HD, Rosamund Lehmann, Vita Sackville West, Winifred Holtby, and others, starting in June 2021. https://www.literaturecambridge.co.uk/women

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If you have ever wanted to study all of Virginia Woolf’s major works in consecutive order, now is your chance — no matter where you live.

Literature Cambridge has planned a “Virginia Woolf Season” that will run from Oct. 24 of this year through June 5, 2021 — and each of 18 study sessions will be available online via Zoom.

This unique eight-month season of Woolf study will cover her 12 major books in order of publication, from The Voyage Out (1915) to Between the Acts (1941). Each session includes a live, newly commissioned online lecture and seminar via Zoom. A few topics are repeated to accommodate different schedules.

Tickets per session

£26 full price
£22 students and CAMcard holders
Book them online.

Schedule of all-new lectures from leading scholars

  1. Saturday, 24 October 2020, 6 p.m. The Voyage Out (1915), with Alison Hennegan

    Karina Jacubowicz

  2. Saturday, 21 November 2020, 6 p.m. Night and Day (1919), with Ellie Mitchell
  3. Saturday, 12 December 2020, 10 a.m. Jacob’s Room (1922), with Alison Hennegan
  4. Saturday, 9 January 2021, 6 p.m. Mrs. Dalloway (1925) 1: Women in Mrs. Dalloway, with Trudi Tate
  5. Sunday, 10 January 2021, 10 a.m. Mrs. Dalloway (1925) 1: Women in Mrs. Dalloway, with Trudi Tate
  6. Saturday, 30 January 2021, 6 p.m. Mrs. Dalloway (1925) 2: Dressing Mrs. Dalloway, with Claire Nicholson
  7. Saturday, 13 February 2021, 6 p.m. To the Lighthouse (1927) 1: Art, with Claudia Tobin
  8. Sunday, 14 February 2021, 10 a.m. To the Lighthouse (1927) 2: Gardens, with Trudi Tate
  9. Sunday, 21 February 2021, 6 p.m. To the Lighthouse (1927) 2: Gardens, with Trudi Tate
  10. Saturday, 27 February 2021, 6 p.m. Orlando (1928): Writing Vita, Writing Life, with Karina Jakubowicz
  11. Saturday, 6 March 2021, 6 p.m. A Room of One’s Own (1929) 1: Androgyny, with Alison Hennegan
  12. Sunday, 14 March 2021, 10 a.m. A Room of One’s Own (1929) 2: Women
  13. Saturday, 3 April 2021, 6 p.m. The Waves (1931) 1: with Ellie Mitchell
  14. Sunday, 4 April 2021, 10 a.m. The Waves (1931) 2: Friendship with Trudi Tate
  15. Saturday, 10 April 2021 6 p.m. Flush: A Biography (1933), with Alison Hennegan
  16. Sunday, 2 May 2021, 6 p.m. The Years (1937), with Anna Snaith
  17. Saturday, 8 May 2021, 6 p.m. Three Guineas (1938) and Music, with Claire Davison
  18. Saturday, 5 June 2021, 10 a.m. Between the Acts (1941): Dispersed are We, with Karina Jakubowicz

Trudi Tate (center) welcomes students to the Virginia Woolf’s Gardens course at Wolfson College at the University of Cambridge in July 2019.

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Last summer I studied Virginia Woolf in person in Cambridge. This summer, I’m studying her from Cambridge, but I’m at home on my laptop via Zoom.

Trudi Tate and Karina Jacubowicz are just two of the lecturers in Literature Cambridge’s online courses on Virginia Woolf and other authors via Zoom.

Last July, I flew to England to study Virginia Woolf as part of the Literature Cambridge course on Virginia Woolf’s Gardens. This year, the program cancelled its in-person courses due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Studying Woolf online and in person

So I, along with dozens of scholars and common readers from around the world, am studying Woolf remotely as part of Literature Cambridge’s sessions on Woolf through its reasonably priced Online Study Sessions. Once held in person at the University of Cambridge, they are now held online via Zoom. And I am enjoying every minute of the delightful, informative lectures, as well as the accompanying question and answer sessions.

Dadie Ryland’s room behind the second floor window shown here inspired the first chapter of Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own.

Last July, in Lit Cambridge’s course on Woolf’s Gardens, we visited Newnham College, the site where Virginia Woolf gave her October 1928 talk on women and fiction that, along with one given at Girton College, became A Room of One’s Own (1929). We toured the gardens of King’s College, saw the window of a room that was the setting for a scene in Woolf’s classic polemic, held Woolf’s manuscript of Room at the Fitzwilliam Museum, admired the flora of Cambridge Botanic Garden, and much more.

I miss those field trips but I appreciate reuniting with the lecturers and students I met at Literature Cambridge and other Woolf encounters.

So far this year, I have attended lectures by Trudi Tate and Karina Jacubowicz on A Room of One’s Own and the Great War, Mrs. Dalloway, and A Room of Own and Space. I have several more on my calendar.

Upcoming study sessions and the Virginia Woolf Season

Online Study Sessions on Woolf and other writers continue through the summer. Here is just part of the upcoming schedule, with all times in British Summer Time:

25 July, 6 p.m. Between the Acts and Gardens
1 August, 6 p.m. Orlando 1 : Property
2 August, 10 a.m. Orlando 1: Property
8 August, 6 p.m. Night and Day
15 August, 6 pm. The Voyage Out

Literature Cambridge will kick off its Virginia Woolf Season in October in which students will discuss 12 major Woolf books in order of publication. Follow its Facebook page for updates.

The Newnham College dining hall where Virginia Woolf gave her famous talk on women and fiction in 1928.

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Literature Cambridge has had a great response to its new Online Study Sessions, launched due to the coronavirus, and has responded by scheduling additional sessions.

Below is the schedule of those still to come. It includes those focused on Virginia Woolf, as well as other authors. The cost is a bargain at £22 full price and £18 for students and CAMcard holders.

Upcoming Online Study Sessions

  • Sunday 17 May: Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own. 1: After the War, with Trudi Tate. 18.00 BST
  • Sunday 24 May: Woolf, Mrs Dalloway. 18.00 BST (SOLD OUT)
  • Saturday 30 May: Woolf, Mrs Dalloway. 18.00 BST (repeat lecture)
  • Saturday 6 June: Woolf. A Room of One’s Own. 2: Women and Education with Alison Hennegan. 18.00
  • Saturday 13 June: Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest. 18.00 BST
  • Sunday 28 June: Katherine Mansfield, Selected short stories. 18.00 BST
  • Saturday 22 August: Angela Carter, stories from The Bloody Chamber. 18.00 BST
  • Sunday 6 September: Clothing in Virginia Woolf’s Orlando. 18.00 BST
  • Saturday 12 September: Reading The Waves Across a Lifetime, with Dame Gillian Beer. 18.00 BST

Most sessions will be held at 18.00 to 20.00 British Summer Time / 19.00 Central European Summer Time. Some sessions will take place at 10.00 am British Summer Time, for the benefit of people in different time zones, but students are welcome to book any session, wherever they are in the world. Check the web page for updates.

NOTE: BST (British Summer Time) is five hours ahead of EST (Eastern Standard Time) and eight hours ahead of PT (Pacific Time).

Literature Cambridge hopes to offer an introductory session on The Waves soon. If there is enough interest, they will offer it twice: once at 10.00 am and again at 18.00 pm BST. Date to be confirmed.

Online Study Session format and booking

Each Online Study Session has a live lecture via Zoom, followed by a moderated seminar discussion. The session lasts about 100 minutes, but please allow two hours. Details are available online.

Bookings are open and can be made online.

Resuming in-person Study Days

Literature Cambridge looks forward to being together again in person for ‘real life’ Study Days. These will take place at a new venue, Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge.

Safety permitting, these will resume on 19 September 2020 with a full day (11.00 am to 5.30 pm) on Woolf’s comic novel, Orlando (1928).

The program also has Study Days and half-days planned on George Eliot’s Middlemarch, Shakespeare’s Richard III, Jane Austen’s Emma, D. H. Lawrence’s poetry and novellas, and more.

A table full of Literature Cambridge T-shirts at the program’s 2018 summer course on Virginia Woolf’s Gardens

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Literature Cambridge has good news for those who live at a distance from the University of Cambridge:  Its upcoming Study Days are moving online. The intensive but accessible sessions will be held via Zoom, due to the coronavirus.

Each session has a lecture and seminar with a leading scholar and will last approximately 100 minutes. Organizers recommend that you allow two hours for each class, just in case they run a bit longer.

LITERATURE CAMBRIDGE ONLINE STUDY DAYS

Study Day: To the Lighthouse: The Mother in the Garden

Date and time: Saturday 9 May, 6–8 p.m. British Summer Time; 7–9 p.m. Central European Time

Join Lit Cambridge for an intensive evening studying one of Virginia Woolf’s greatest novels. Based on Woolf’s memories of childhood summers by the sea, To the Lighthouse is a powerfully moving account of love, art and loss.

Lecture and a seminar led by Trudi Tate, Director of Literature Cambridge and a Fellow of Clare Hall, University of Cambridge.

Date and Time for other time zones: Sunday 10 May 2020 (Repeat class)

Lit Cambridge will repeat the topic on 10 May, for the benefit of people in Japan, Australia, and similar time zones. But you are welcome to book, wherever you are. This will be a live lecture and seminar, via Zoom.

10.00-12.00 British Summer Time
11.00-13.00 Central European Time
18.00-20.00 Tokyo Time
19.00-21.00 Melbourne time
21.00-23.00 New Zealand Time

Study Day: Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway

Date and time: Sunday 24 May, 6–8 p.m. British Summer Time; 7–9 p.m. Central European Time

An intensive evening studying Virginia Woolf’s memorable novel set on a single day in London in 1923. Mrs Dalloway traces the joys, sufferings, and memories of two very different characters: Clarissa Dalloway, married to a Conservative Member of Parliament; and Septimus Smith, a former soldier who is suffering from shell shock.

Lecture and seminar led by Trudi Tate, Director of Literature Cambridge and a Fellow of Clare Hall, University of Cambridge, who has a chapter on Mrs Dalloway in her book, Modernism, History and the First World War .

Tickets and Bookings

£22 full price

£18 students and CAMcard holders

Bookings are open and can be made online.

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