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Once again, Literature Cambridge is offering a wide array of online courses featuring Virginia Woolf and other renowned women writers who were her contemporaries. Read on for the details.

Women Writers Season

Go online to study a range of Woolf’s wonderful contemporaries. Authors on the list include Elizabeth Bowen, Winifred Holtby, Zora Neale Hurston, Rosamund Lehmann, Katherine Mansfield, Vita Sackville West, and many others — a full dozen in all.

The season focuses on writers in English, with most, but not all, based in Britain. Many of the authors included are not read widely today.

This is a great opportunity to discover some wonderful writers, and to study them with leading scholars.

Each online study session has a live lecture with a leading scholar and seminar on Zoom.

The season runs from June to September 2021. Get the details.

Virginia Woolf Season

The second Woolf Season starts in October 2021, runs through May 2022, and studies most of Woolf’s major works in detail. It includes live online lectures and seminars with leading scholars. Get the details.

The first season which explored Woolf’s major works in consecutive order, began in October 2020 with The Voyage Out (1915) and ran through June of this year with Between the Acts (1941).

Each two-hour class via Zoom was taught by a Woolf expert from the UK and featured a one-hour original lecture followed by a question and answer session.

Summer Wednesdays

As requested, some popular past sessions will be repeated on Wednesdays at 2 p.m. British Summer Time during July and August. Topics include:

Special rates for members

Members of the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain can book at the student rate for Woolf sessions.

Karina Jacubowicz is just one lecturer in Literature Cambridge’s online courses on Virginia Woolf via Zoom.

A Literature Cambridge Zoom room

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Literature Cambridge will finish its first Woolf Season with the last of Virginia Woolf’s major books.

Here is what remains on the schedule:

• Anna Snaith on The Years (1937), Sun. 2 May, 6 p.m.
• Claire Davison on Three Guineas (1938), Sat. 8 May, 6 p.m.
• Claire Nicholson on Between the Acts (1941): Costume, Sat. 29 May, 6 p.m.
• Karina Jukobowicz on Between the Acts (1941): Dispersed Are We, Sat. 5 June, 10 a.m.

Two repeats

And, in case you missed them, two earlier lectures will be repeated:

• Claudia Tobin, Art in To the Lighthouse (1927), Sun. 16 May, 6 p.m.
• Emma Sutton and Jeremy Thurlow, Music in The Waves (1931), Sun. 30 May, 6 p.m.

All sessions are live on Zoom. All times are British Summer Time. Sessions can be booked online.

Trudi Tate and Karina Jacubowicz are just two of the lecturers in the Literature Cambridge’s online courses on Virginia Woolf via Zoom.

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Attention, Woolf readers around the globe. Literature Cambridge, which went virtual with its study sessions when the coronavirus hit, is in the midst of a Virginia Woolf Season that you won’t want to miss.

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Trudi Tate and Karina Jacubowicz are just two lecturers in Literature Cambridge’s online courses on Virginia Woolf via Zoom.

I, for one, have logged on to several sessions and plan to sign up for as many as my schedule will allow. Not only do I enjoy learning more about Woolf, it’s also fun to see old and new Woolf friends from all over the world, while benefiting from their knowledge and interest in Woolf.

Woolf Season details

The online classes, which explore Woolf’s major works in consecutive order, began in October with The Voyage Out (1915) and run through June 2021 with Between the Acts (1941). Each two-hour class via Zoom is taught by a Woolf expert from the UK and features a one-hour original lecture followed by a question and answer session.

Lisa Hutchins, who lives in Cambridge and is a former journalist turned college archivist, is penning blog posts on the Woolf Season. She wrote one on The Voyage Out and another on the lecture covering Night and Day: Tea and Tradition.

The cost is £26 at full price and £22 for students, CAMcard holders and members of the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain.

Read the Woolf Season blog

Lisa Hutchins, who lives in Cambridge and is a former journalist turned college archivist, is penning blog posts on the Woolf Season. She wrote one on The Voyage Out and another on the lecture covering Night and Day: Tea and Tradition.

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If you have ever wanted to study all of Virginia Woolf’s major works in consecutive order, now is your chance — no matter where you live.

Literature Cambridge has planned a “Virginia Woolf Season” that will run from Oct. 24 of this year through June 5, 2021 — and each of 18 study sessions will be available online via Zoom.

This unique eight-month season of Woolf study will cover her 12 major books in order of publication, from The Voyage Out (1915) to Between the Acts (1941). Each session includes a live, newly commissioned online lecture and seminar via Zoom. A few topics are repeated to accommodate different schedules.

Tickets per session

£26 full price
£22 students and CAMcard holders
Book them online.

Schedule of all-new lectures from leading scholars

  1. Saturday, 24 October 2020, 6 p.m. The Voyage Out (1915), with Alison Hennegan

    Karina Jacubowicz

  2. Saturday, 21 November 2020, 6 p.m. Night and Day (1919), with Ellie Mitchell
  3. Saturday, 12 December 2020, 10 a.m. Jacob’s Room (1922), with Alison Hennegan
  4. Saturday, 9 January 2021, 6 p.m. Mrs. Dalloway (1925) 1: Women in Mrs. Dalloway, with Trudi Tate
  5. Sunday, 10 January 2021, 10 a.m. Mrs. Dalloway (1925) 1: Women in Mrs. Dalloway, with Trudi Tate
  6. Saturday, 30 January 2021, 6 p.m. Mrs. Dalloway (1925) 2: Dressing Mrs. Dalloway, with Claire Nicholson
  7. Saturday, 13 February 2021, 6 p.m. To the Lighthouse (1927) 1: Art, with Claudia Tobin
  8. Sunday, 14 February 2021, 10 a.m. To the Lighthouse (1927) 2: Gardens, with Trudi Tate
  9. Sunday, 21 February 2021, 6 p.m. To the Lighthouse (1927) 2: Gardens, with Trudi Tate
  10. Saturday, 27 February 2021, 6 p.m. Orlando (1928): Writing Vita, Writing Life, with Karina Jakubowicz
  11. Saturday, 6 March 2021, 6 p.m. A Room of One’s Own (1929) 1: Androgyny, with Alison Hennegan
  12. Sunday, 14 March 2021, 10 a.m. A Room of One’s Own (1929) 2: Women
  13. Saturday, 3 April 2021, 6 p.m. The Waves (1931) 1: with Ellie Mitchell
  14. Sunday, 4 April 2021, 10 a.m. The Waves (1931) 2: Friendship with Trudi Tate
  15. Saturday, 10 April 2021 6 p.m. Flush: A Biography (1933), with Alison Hennegan
  16. Sunday, 2 May 2021, 6 p.m. The Years (1937), with Anna Snaith
  17. Saturday, 8 May 2021, 6 p.m. Three Guineas (1938) and Music, with Claire Davison
  18. Saturday, 5 June 2021, 10 a.m. Between the Acts (1941): Dispersed are We, with Karina Jakubowicz

Trudi Tate (center) welcomes students to the Virginia Woolf’s Gardens course at Wolfson College at the University of Cambridge in July 2019.

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Last summer I studied Virginia Woolf in person in Cambridge. This summer, I’m studying her from Cambridge, but I’m at home on my laptop via Zoom.

Trudi Tate and Karina Jacubowicz are just two of the lecturers in Literature Cambridge’s online courses on Virginia Woolf and other authors via Zoom.

Last July, I flew to England to study Virginia Woolf as part of the Literature Cambridge course on Virginia Woolf’s Gardens. This year, the program cancelled its in-person courses due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Studying Woolf online and in person

So I, along with dozens of scholars and common readers from around the world, am studying Woolf remotely as part of Literature Cambridge’s sessions on Woolf through its reasonably priced Online Study Sessions. Once held in person at the University of Cambridge, they are now held online via Zoom. And I am enjoying every minute of the delightful, informative lectures, as well as the accompanying question and answer sessions.

Dadie Ryland’s room behind the second floor window shown here inspired the first chapter of Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own.

Last July, in Lit Cambridge’s course on Woolf’s Gardens, we visited Newnham College, the site where Virginia Woolf gave her October 1928 talk on women and fiction that, along with one given at Girton College, became A Room of One’s Own (1929). We toured the gardens of King’s College, saw the window of a room that was the setting for a scene in Woolf’s classic polemic, held Woolf’s manuscript of Room at the Fitzwilliam Museum, admired the flora of Cambridge Botanic Garden, and much more.

I miss those field trips but I appreciate reuniting with the lecturers and students I met at Literature Cambridge and other Woolf encounters.

So far this year, I have attended lectures by Trudi Tate and Karina Jacubowicz on A Room of One’s Own and the Great War, Mrs. Dalloway, and A Room of Own and Space. I have several more on my calendar.

Upcoming study sessions and the Virginia Woolf Season

Online Study Sessions on Woolf and other writers continue through the summer. Here is just part of the upcoming schedule, with all times in British Summer Time:

25 July, 6 p.m. Between the Acts and Gardens
1 August, 6 p.m. Orlando 1 : Property
2 August, 10 a.m. Orlando 1: Property
8 August, 6 p.m. Night and Day
15 August, 6 pm. The Voyage Out

Literature Cambridge will kick off its Virginia Woolf Season in October in which students will discuss 12 major Woolf books in order of publication. Follow its Facebook page for updates.

The Newnham College dining hall where Virginia Woolf gave her famous talk on women and fiction in 1928.

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