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Posts Tagged ‘Virginia Woolf’

If a Virginia Woolf fan is on your Christmas list, here are a few gift suggestions — from a pricey purse to a Woolf society membership — that might bring pleasure. Even if that fan is you.

To the Lighthouse in a stamp print

To the Lighthouse is featured in the stamp in the top row, far right.

Stamp Book: Modern Classics, is a print that turns 42 modern classic books into an oversized sheet of collectable postage stamps, including one for Woolf’s To the Lighthouse.

Each stamp features a graphic inspired by the book and the date of publication in book form. The four-color prints measure 80cm x 60cm and are litho printed with an additional silver foil.

From Dorothy, it is available to purchase for £35 each from wearedorothy.com

The Waves Strapped will strap you

For the tonier among us, there is The Waves Strapped pocketbook at a price of 1.180,00 € from Olympia LeTan.

Constructed of cotton, wool, and silk, this book-shaped bag hinges open, closes with a brass clasp, is lined in a floral print, and includes a shoulder strap. It is a limited, numbered edition and can also be personalized.

Orlando-inspired Fendi fashions

Also out of our price range, but fun to look at anyhow, are designer Kim Jones’s first collection inspired by the Bloomsbury Group, specifically Virginia Woolf’s Orlando. Created for the luxury fashion house Fendi, the spring 2021 fashions are priced comparably to luxury cars.

Virginia Woolf in needlepoint

Winter is a great time to cozy up indoors with a needlework project — and Appletons Virginia Woolf Tapestry Needlepoint Kit may be just the ticket.

Available from Liberty, the $73 price includes all materials, plus shipping. Mine arrived in the four to five days noted on the website.

Once completed, the tapestry can be framed or stitched into a pillow. It is part of a collection that pays tribute to the luminaries of British and Irish literature.

I haven’t started mine yet, but the kit looks pretty cool displayed in its classy black box on my bookshelf.

Puzzling Woolf won’t break the bank

“Jane Austen’s Book Club” puzzle by eeBoo

My last suggestion — and one that is the most cost-effective — is a puzzle that includes Woolf or something related to her.

The EuroGraphics Famous Writers 1000 Piece Puzzle features Woolf smack dab in the middle of 75 other famous writers. Its finished size is 19.25″ x 26.5″ and the cost is $20.32.

Second, there’s the Re-marks Bestsellers Panoramic 1000 Piece Puzzle, which includes covers of many best-selling books, including two of Woolf’s — Orlando and Mrs. Dalloway. It measures 17″ x 9″ and the cost is $28.99.

Third is a 1,000-piece eeBoo puzzle titled “Jane Austen’s Book Club.” Woolf, along with Austen, Mary Shelley, George Eliot, and Zora Neale Huston, are pictured sipping tea, alongside some of their famous titles. It’s 11″ x 11″ and is $23.99.

Gift a society membership to yourself or a friend

International Virginia Woolf Society logo

The most practical and appreciated gift of all may be a membership to one of the Virginia Woolf societies.

Besides developing friendships with other Woolf scholars and common readers, memberships may include subscriptions to publications, access to Zoom events, invitations to in-person events, and other perks.

Get more information at the following links:

 

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It’s nearly time for Woolf Salon No. 15: “Time Passes” (A Reading). This time, Salon Conspirators have planned a full read-through of the hauntingly poetic middle section of Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse (1927), followed by an open discussion.

Details

Hosts: Salon Conspirators
Day: Friday, Dec. 10
Time: 3 p.m.–5 p.m. ET / Noon –2 p.m  PT / 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. Brasilia / 8 p.m. – 10 p.m. BST / 9 p.m. – 11 p.m. CEST
How to join: Anyone can join the group, which meets on one Friday of each month via Zoom and focuses on a single topic or text. Just contact woolfsalonproject@gmail.com to sign up for the email list and receive the Zoom link.

Background on the Salon

The Salon Conspirators — Hagen, Shilo McGiff, Amy Smith, and Drew Shannon — began the Woolf Salon Project in July 2020 to provide opportunities for conversation and conviviality among Woolf-interested scholars, students, and common readers during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Now is the time to submit panel proposals on Virginia Woolf for the Modern Language Association Convention, scheduled for Jan. 5-8, 2023, in San Francisco. Submissions are due Dec. 17.

The International Virginia Woolf Society will have one guaranteed panel on Woolf at the 2023 Convention. The group can also submit one additional panel proposal (which is often accepted but not guaranteed). And it can also collaborate with another allied organization and submit a third panel proposal. These joint panels elicit especially lively, productive exchanges.

Guidelines for submissions

  • Note that this is a call for panel proposals, not individual paper proposals.
  • Please submit one topic only. The submission should include the following:
    • a maximum 35-word description (word count includes title)
    • the name(s) and contact information of the proposed organizer(s)

How to submit

Please submit your proposal to Benjamin Hagen, president of the IVWS, via email to Benjamin.Hagen@usd.edu with the subject line Woolf MLA 2023. The submission deadline is Dec. 17, 2021.

Once proposals are in, Hagen will send them out to IVWS members for a vote. Anyone who wishes to propose a session of their own outside of the IVWS process can visit the MLA website.

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Imagine my double-take when, scrolling through the LitHub Daily recently, I came across an ad for a new book, Insignificance by James Clammer.

The caption read “A plumber’s Mrs. Dalloway.”

The book is described as an interior-monologue lyric novel, a single day in the life of Joe Forbes, reluctant plumber and anguished father. The TLS calls it “A descent into the suburban uncanny and the English soul.” The Spectator links it to Woolf: “Like Mrs. Dalloway, it immerses us in the rush of a different life, the strangeness of another body.”

I may not read it, but the reviewers are taking it seriously, and it sounds compelling. Who am I to snicker?

Palace of the Drowned

A New York Times review drew me to Christine Mangan’s Palace of the Drowned, which “heaves with allusions to other books and other authors — a little Patricia Highsmith here, a little Virginia Woolf there, glimpses of Shirley Jackson’s “The Haunting of Hill House” someplace else.”

A novel about a novelist, when Frankie’s latest work is panned and she causes a scene, she goes to Italy, where she’s stalked by an admirer:

“You’re not the first author to receive a bad review,” Gilly tells her. “Dostoyevsky. Hemingway. Did you know Virginia Woolf was terribly affected by criticism? She didn’t even like to read what others wrote about her fellow authors. She said that no creative writer can swallow another contemporary.”

As the Highsmith and Jackson references imply, there’s suspense and intrigue here too, and Venice—all that’s missing are the Bellinis (the drink, not the painter or the composer).

The Plot

 I can’t resist novels about writers writing; Jean Hanff Korelitz’s The Plot is another. A twisted tale of plagiarism and intrigue, the protagonist justifies his actions: “He would hardly be the first to take some tale from a play or a book—in this case, a book that had never been written!—and create something entirely new from it. Miss Saigon from Madam Butterfly. The Hours from Mrs. Dalloway. The Lion King from Hamlet, for goodness’ sake!”

 

 

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Several blue plaques commemorate London addresses at which members of the Bloomsbury Group, including Virginia Woolf, lived. Now a similar plaque — in black — will recognize Talland House, Virginia Woolf’s summertime residence in St. Ives, Cornwall.

Jean Moorcroft Wilson on the doorstep of 46 Gordon Square, Woolf’s first Bloomsbury home during #DallowayDay2018. A blue plaque noting the significance of the site is to the right of the front door.

The news, shared by Woolf scholar Maggie Humm, author of the novel Talland House, came via the VWoolfListserv, as well as social media.

Her message to the Listserv stated:

Virginia Woolf is to have a plaque on Talland House St Ives. Following my research and many requests (for the VWSGB) St Ives Town Council has just voted unanimously in support. I was able, additionally, to secure the support of the local MP. The plaque will be black (in line with Cornwall’s flag) not blue as London plaques. More details of dates/funding/design to follow.

Blue Plaque at 29 Fitzroy Square, London, where Virginia and Adrian Stephen lived from 1907-1911.

Blue plaque noting that Virginia and Leonard Woolf lived at Hogarth House, Richmond from 1915-1924 and founded the Hogarth Press there in 1917.

The blue plaque on the side of the Tavistock Hotel commemorating Virginia and Leonard Woolf’s tenure at 52 Tavistock Square, London. It was draped in blue at its unveiling in 2018.

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