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Posts Tagged ‘Virginia Woolf’

Bernardine Evaristo

Imagine a different ending to Clarissa Dalloway’s party. That what Bernadine Evaristo did as part of Radio 3’s “The Essay,” which asked five leading writers to pick a novel they love and then write an original piece of fiction imagining what happened to the characters after the story ends.

Man Booker prize winner Evaristo picked Virginia Woolf’s 1925 novel Mrs. Dalloway for her “Open Endings” podcast submission. She then imagined a different ending for Clarissa’s party.

How to listen

Her 14-minute podcast, “Bernardine Evaristo on Mrs. Dalloway,” first aired on Christmas Eve 2019. But if you missed it, you can still listen to it any of the following three ways:

  • Tune in to Radio 3’s “The Essay” on Aug. 3 at 10:45 p.m. (BST).
  • Listen now on the Radio 3 website.
  • Download the podcast for listening any time.

About the author

Evaristo is not new to radio. Her verse novel The Emperor’s Babe was adapted into a BBC Radio 4 play in 2013 and her novella Hello Mum was adapted as a BBC Radio 4 play in 2012. In 2015 she wrote and presented a two-part BBC Radio 4 documentary called Fiery Inspiration: Amiri Baraka and the Black Arts Movement.

 

 

 

 

 

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Once again, Literature Cambridge is offering a wide array of online courses featuring Virginia Woolf and other renowned women writers who were her contemporaries. Read on for the details.

Women Writers Season

Go online to study a range of Woolf’s wonderful contemporaries. Authors on the list include Elizabeth Bowen, Winifred Holtby, Zora Neale Hurston, Rosamund Lehmann, Katherine Mansfield, Vita Sackville West, and many others — a full dozen in all.

The season focuses on writers in English, with most, but not all, based in Britain. Many of the authors included are not read widely today.

This is a great opportunity to discover some wonderful writers, and to study them with leading scholars.

Each online study session has a live lecture with a leading scholar and seminar on Zoom.

The season runs from June to September 2021. Get the details.

Virginia Woolf Season

The second Woolf Season starts in October 2021, runs through May 2022, and studies most of Woolf’s major works in detail. It includes live online lectures and seminars with leading scholars. Get the details.

The first season which explored Woolf’s major works in consecutive order, began in October 2020 with The Voyage Out (1915) and ran through June of this year with Between the Acts (1941).

Each two-hour class via Zoom was taught by a Woolf expert from the UK and featured a one-hour original lecture followed by a question and answer session.

Summer Wednesdays

As requested, some popular past sessions will be repeated on Wednesdays at 2 p.m. British Summer Time during July and August. Topics include:

Special rates for members

Members of the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain can book at the student rate for Woolf sessions.

Karina Jacubowicz is just one lecturer in Literature Cambridge’s online courses on Virginia Woolf via Zoom.

A Literature Cambridge Zoom room

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For anyone who reads and loves Virginia Woolf, St. Ives is a magical place. Take a trip back in time by viewing old footage of that Cornish town.
  • From the BBC iPlayer comes “Cornwall: This Fishing Life,” with series 2, episode 4, focusing on St. Ives. It includes old black and white film footage of the place where Woolf and the Stephen family spent their summers until she was 12.
  • Nineteen seconds of color film footage of St. Ives from Claude Friese-Greene’s The Open Road (1926) a fascinating social record of inter-war Britain. The St. Ives snippet below is available on the British Film Industry‘s YouTube Channel.
  • And just for fun, check out the video below of a model railroad version of St. Ives, circa the 1950s, created by a former St. Ives resident. In this eight-minute video, he adds his own memories, along with details about constructing the layout. Stuart Clarke of the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain shared this video and notes that we “may” be able to see Talland House at the 4-minute, 32-second mark.

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An essay by Blogging Woolf contributor Alice Woolf published May 19 on (mac)ro(mic) discusses a dreaded topic — aging — and includes the views of Dorothy Parker and Virginia Woolf.

Alice Lowe

Woolf used to address her future self—old Virginia—in her diary; days before her death she reminded herself to “observe the oncome of age. — Lowe

Lowe has written about Woolf and aging before. In 2017 she connected Woolf with aging, writing, and her own decision to get a tattoo.

Besides writing for Blogging Woolf, Lowe blogs at aliceloweblogs.wordpress.com. Her flash prose has appeared this past year in Hobart, JMWW, Door Is a Jar, Sleet, Anti-Heroin Chic, and BurningWord. She’s had citations in Best American Essays and nominations for Pushcart Prizes and Best of the Net.

 

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At a time when inaccurate information spreads like wildfire via social media, it’s refreshing to learn that a major media outlet is interested in fact checking something as seemingly minor as a literary quote, particularly one attributed to Virginia Woolf.

“You cannot find peace by avoiding life” was the quote attributed to Woolf and shared more than 300 times by a Facebook group called “English literature and Linguistics.”

USA TODAY on the hunt

Then USA TODAY noticed. And reporter Rick Rouan, based in Columbus, Ohio, started checking into it. On his own, he was unable to find a record of Woolf saying or writing those words.

So he contacted a couple of folks in the Woolf community, including Blogging Woolf and Benjamin Hagen, assistant professor of English at the University of South Dakota who is heading up this year’s Woolf conference and serves as president of the International Virginia Woolf Society.

Woolfians join the search

I searched my copy of Major Authors on CD-ROM: Virginia Woolf and found no such statement in Woolf’s work. But Hagen traced it to the 2002 film “The Hours,” which is based on Michael Cunningham’s novel of the same title, inspired by Woolf’s 1925 novel Mrs. Dalloway.

The Facebook group that posted the quote Rouan investigated has apparently removed it from its page. Fact-checking information shared online is something USA TODAY does regularly, Rouan told me.

Read more about the hunt for the quote and its origins in “Fact check: Quote attributed to Virginia Woolf was in a movie, not her primary work.”

A collection of memes found in a Google search that include the quote falsely attributed to Woolf

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