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Posts Tagged ‘Penguin books’

It’s less than a week until the U.S. presidential election, and our first Woolf sighting turns to Virginia’s diary — and a new book — to discover her political leanings. See 1. Even more of the moment, today is Halloween, and a New Yorker reader thinks a sexy Virginia Woolf is the worst Halloween costume ever. See 14.

  1. This feast of diaries may leave you with indigestion: EVENTS, DEAR BOY …, Daily Mail
    In 1929 both Virginia Woolf and her servant Nelly intend to vote Labour, but Comrade Virginia’s radicalism has its limits. ‘I don’t want to be ruled by Nelly,’ she snorts. By 1952 the descendants of Nelly are living high on the hog. Labour MP Richard …
  2. The London best: sleep aidsEvening Standard
    Virginia Woolf called sleep “that deplorable curtailment of the joy of life”. Yet most of London now fantasises about eight hours uninterrupted by the strepitous sex sessions of foxes or the early sounding of the alarm. With the clocks going back on 
  3. Finding souls in a search for solacePhiladelphia Inquirer
    The result was Pilgrimage, (Random House, 2011), a book of photographs from Leibovitz’s global search for solace. She visited the homes of Sigmund Freud andVirginia Woolf, of Elvis Presley and Eleanor Roosevelt, Georgia O’Keefe and Martha Graham.
  4. On the Couch: Study links creativity with mental illnessEaling Gazette
    Whilst troubled writers such as Virginia Woolf and Ernest Hemmingway would appear to bear this out, we know that in fact mental illness affects 25% of the population, not all of whom are creative geniuses! That said, a study by the same institute in 
  5. Saints and doubtersThe Christian Century
    Their daughter, Virginia Woolf, raised without a faith to lose, sought new forms of the sacred in her writing, new expressions of religious experience focused around what she called “moments of being”—moments when the pattern through which we are all 
  6. Reviewed: Sitelines’ Sailing OnReading Chronicle
    Following their own watery deaths, the writer Virginia Woolf and Shakespeare’s Ophelia have taken up residence in the toilets, where they observe the habits of its patrons. One young woman in particular, Romola, has caught their attention and by 
  7. The old man and the seaSydney Morning Herald
    The war trilogy was first published in London, by Hogarth, the press established by Leonard and Virginia Woolf. ”I would prefer it to be published there,” Parkin observed, ”for it does seem that no prophet is acceptable in his own country.” The 
  8. Murder on the dancefloor: art’s fascination with deathThe Guardian
    Photograph: Allstar/Cinetext/PARAMOUNT. Virginia Woolf, an admiring reader of Proust, was interested in the dramatic potential of the party as a way of bringing to the fore that which the joviality of the occasion attempts to deny. In Mrs Dalloway’s 
  9. Art Review ‘Picasso Black and White,’ at GuggenheimBoston Globe
    With the likes of Mozart, Virginia Woolf, and Picasso, the unspoken implication is so often: They can’t help themselves; the art just spouts out. If, in addition, the genius’s personality is awkward, or his personal life chaotic to the point of self 
  10. Carolyn Hitt: There are no longer barriers blocking female authorsWalesOnline
    Mary Ann Evans had to call herself George Eliot to get noticed while Virginia Woolf attempted to rent us a room of our own in the palace of patriarchy. When I read English at university 25 years ago we prided ourselves on the rows of ivy green spines 
  11. Author’s mum hated his Pulitzer Prize winning bookStraits Times
    The story traces the lives of three women affected by the 1925 Virginia Woolf novel, Mrs Dalloway. Cunningham’s mother was the inspiration behind the character of a bored housewife, and she did not like having her life on display. “She didn’t like the 
  12. Questioningly Results: Worst Halloween CostumeNew Yorker (blog)
    And, of course, many readers imagined inappropriate variations on seductive Halloween wear: sexy baby (from @MargoLezowitz), sexy George Bush (from @capitalsquirrel), sexy Virginia Woolf (from @andrewnford), sexy JarJar Binks (from @nemesisn4sa), 
  13. Prescription for laughterThe National
    It’s a busy Thursday night in Bloomsbury, the central London district where Virginia Woolf’s infamous set held court. At a plush, packed theatre, Ben Smith’s increasingly popular set is causing uproar. Smith also has literary links, being the younger 
  14. The Penguin-Random House book merger is a big deal: MallickToronto Star
    A writer has a vision, like a fin in the water as Virginia Woolf put it, a book is written and read, notions are floated and ingested like billions of plankton and suddenly the world has changed. Ideas are worth money. The book world is imprinted with 

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The new cover designs by Angus Hyland for a hardback series of Woolf’s major works inspired numerous comments on the VWoolf Listserv this week.

Stephen Barkway shared this photo of how the series was displayed last month in Foyles bookshop in the Charing Cross Road.

Trouble is, all of them were negative.

The series includes Mrs. DallowayA Room of One’s OwnTo the LighthouseThe Waves, and Orlando and is available on Penguin Books U.K. site for 14 pounds (about $21) each.

The covers are modeled after the textile designs of the Omega Workshop, but subscribers to the list don’t see the resemblance.

Here are some of the comments shared by list members:

Ugh.

Yuck.

I am not a fan either.  Whoever could have used Japanese prints to better effect.  I actually tried to put the cover with book meaningfully.  I failed.  Wouldn’t want them on my shelves.  I even preferred the mono-colored covers shown on the page.  Woolf must be –well I wonder what snarky remark she would have, and rightly so.

Am I alone in finding these new book jacket cover designs  rather – Harsh? Aggressive? Unsympathetic? The article claims that “They’re modeled after the textile designs of the Omega Workshop” but I don’t see much resemblance to what I know of the Omega designs.

no, Roy, you are so NOT alone. Let’s add HIDEOUS, grotesque, repellent, and vile. But that’s just an opinion, of course. Beauty is the eye, etc.

Fancy designing a cover for “A Room of One’s Own” that doesn’t mention that “Three Guineas” is also included!  Could this be a CONSPIRACY — or just a cock-up? Of course, I may be wrong: it may just be printed in a *very* large typeface and so needs to run to 432 pages: http://www.penguin.co.uk/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9780141198545,00.html?/A_Room_of_One’s_Own_Virginia_Woolf Aye, as we say in Edinburgh: All fur coat and nae knickers.

I am not a fan either.  The covers seem not only to bear no resemblance to Omega designs, they also seem pretty arbitrary as to the contents of the books.  The choice of covers for the new annotated Harcourts shows how you can choose appropriate (mostly) non-representational art for Woolf covers if you actually have a strong sense of their content.  These look like a series of monoprints someone had lying around which they attached to the books pretty superficially (Orlando is a big O; The Waves has blue on it…) The one used for Room would have been more suggestive for Mrs. Dalloway (the sane and the insane side by side) though thinking of all the colors used in Woolf’s works, that muddy chartreuse is as far from her taste as I can imagine.

What do you think of the new cover designs? Cast your vote below.

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